About Jim Corbett National Park

Jim Corbett National Park is one of the most celebrated wildlife reserve in India. This park is spread in Nainital, Pauri and Almora district. Corbett National Park is an amazing blend of high hills, swamp, River side belts and green meadows covering an area of 522 kilometers at the foot hills of the greater himalayas and this makes the park a heaven for wildlife adventures lovers. This park is famous for variety of rare flora, wild animals, reptiles and birds species. A pathway adorn with mango orchards leads one into a complete different world housing a record number of 488 different species of plants and 580 birds type. Moreover a plethora of 25 reptile species and 50 species of mammals are reasons enough to go personal with this wonderland. Corbett Safari, www.dudhwanationalpark.in, belongs to such an individuals who deal in online booking for jim corbett safari, online corbett jeep safari booking, online jim corbett forest lodge booking, online corbett elephant safari booking, online dhikala safari booking, online dhikala jungle tour packages booking, corbett forest resort booking, jim corbett online booking, jim corbett national park online booking, online corbett booking, online jim corbett resorts, corbett hotels, guest house booking. We are bound to follow the same rules and regulations which are directed by the Corbett Tiger Reserve & Uttarakhand Government. The source of the data & information relating to Jim Corbett National Park is the official website of Corbett Tiger Reserve Ramnagar Uttarakhand India.

Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR) is One of India's richest wilderness areas. The Tiger Reserve encompasses an area of 1288.34 sq km, which include two Protected Areas: Corbett National Park (520.82 sq. km) and Sonanadi Wildlife Sanctuary (301.18 sq. km)

Corbett National Park has captured the imagination of many with its diverse wildlife and breathtaking landscapes. The natural uniqueness of the area was recognised long ago and so in 1936 Corbett attained the distinction as the first national park to be established in mainland Asia. Corbett National Park lies in two districts - Nainital and Pauri - in the hill state of Uttaranchal in northern India. It covers an area of 521 sq. km and together with the neighbouring Sonanadi Wildlife Sanctuary and Reserve Forest areas, forms the Corbett Tiger Reserve over 1288 sq. km. Its geographical location between the Himalayas and the terai, and the streams, rivers and ridges crisscrossing the terrain, present Corbett with a remarkable variety of landscapes. This vivid mosaic of habitats - wet and dry, plain and mountainous, gentle and rugged, forests and grasslands - supports numerous plant and animal species, representing Himalayan as well as plains kinds. The most famous of Corbett's wild residents are the Bengal Tiger and the Asiatic Elephant, but with about 600 species of avifauna Corbett is one of the richest bird regions of India.


Flora & Fauna - Jim Corbett National Park

Jim Corbett National Park is famous for natural bounty and wildlife splendour. The Park is spread over more than 520 sq. km. The diverse offering of floral count of Corbett Park is astonishing. There are about 110 types of trees, 51 types of shrubs, 27 types of climbers and 33 types of bamboo and grass are found. The most visible trees seen in Corbett are Sal Shorea Robusta, which is found over 75% of the main area.

Main Flora in Jim Corbett National Park

Sheesam, Dhak, Sisoo, and Khair are the most visible trees found in Corbett. A lot of other varieties are found around the park which contributes to the diversity of species. The only conifer found in the park is Chir Pine, and is seen on ridge tops like Chir Choti and declines in Gajar Sot. The higher reaches near Kanda shelters Banj Oak growing, which is a typical Himalayan species. Kanju (Holoptelia Integrifolia), Jamun (Syzygium Cumini) and Aamla (Emblica Officinalis) are seen growing in major areas.

Other main types of trees in Corbett Park

  • Bel
  • Kusum
  • Mahua
  • Bakli

There are also breeds of flowering trees found here. Flowering trees compliments the hue of the forests of Corbett. The major ones are Kachnaar (Bauhinia Variegata) with pink to white flowers, Semal (Bombax Ceiba) with large red blooms, Dhak or Flame-of-the-forest (Butea Monosperma) with illuminating orange flowers, Madaar or Indian Coral (Erythrinia Indica) with scarlet red flowers and Amaltas (Cassia Fistula) with shining yellow chandelier like blooms.

Main Trees : There are few species of trees which are artificially planted and grown in the park. These species don't grow naturally here

  • Teak
  • Eucalyptus
  • Jacaranda
  • Silver Oak
  • Bottlebrush

Grass: There are more than 70 types of grass groups found in Corbett. They include

  • Kansi
  • Themeda Arundinacea
  • Baib or Bhabar
  • Narkul
  • Tiger Grass
  • Khus Khus

Spear Grass with sharp blades subjected to cause damage to clothes and human skin.

Bamboo:

A few portions of Corbett vegetation is occupied by bamboo forest. The major type of bamboo found is male bamboo having clustered stout stems and lightning papery stem sheaths. Bamboos have a distinct flowering habit. All bamboos of a forest flower together once in long time, after several decades. After flowering, fruiting and dispersal of seeds, all plants decay at the same time.

Main Fauna of Jim Corbett National Park

Corbett National Park is home for many wonderful as well as endangered species of animals. The natural bounty and vast landscapes provide perfect habitat for wildlife here. The park plays a dutiful shelter in preserving a variety of flora count.

Mammals

Royal Bengal Tiger, Leopard, Jungle Cat, Asian Elephant, Hog Deer, Spotted Deer, Barking Deer, Chital, Sambar Deer, Wild Boar, Black Faced Monkey, Rheus Monkey, Wild Pig and Jackal etc.

Birds

Peacock, Jungle Foul, White Bush Chat, Oriental Pied, Emerald Dove, Red Wattle Lapwing, the Asian Paradise Flycatcher, Rested Kingfisher, Indian Shirks, Indian Alpine Swift, Woodpecker, laughing Thrush, Vulture, Parakeet, kales Pheasant, Oriole, Common Grey Hornbill, Duck, Stork, Cormorant, Parrot, Indian Roller, Teal, Seagull etc.

Reptiles

Indian Crocodile, Gharial, king Cobra, Krait Cobra, Russels Viper, Python and Monitor Lizard etc.

Fish

Kalimuchi, Mahaseer, Troude, Goonch, Kalabasu, Chilwa etc.

Landscape and Geology

Himalayas and Shiwaliks

Mountains offer a great diversity of habitats due to variation in altitude, relief, and temperature. Consequently, mountain plant and animal communities have unique characteristics.

Corbett National Park is characteristic of the Himalayan mountain system. Corbett's northern areas are lined by the Lesser Himalayan chain, which extends from Pakistan, through Jammu and Kashmir, Himachal, Uttaranchal, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan, and to Arunachal. The Lesser Himalayas are quite high, with an average altitude of 1800 m and are made up of crystalline rocks. The vegetation includes cold-climate tree species like pine, oak, and rhododendron. The Forest Rest House at Kanda at 1300 m is the highest point in the Park and is representative of the Lesser Himalayas

However, most of the Park lies in the Outer-Himalayan or Shiwalik region. The Shiwaliks are the southernmost of the Himalayan ranges and are much lower than the Lesser Himalayas. They are formed of sedimentary rocks and are hence crumbly and unstable. The Shiwaliks form the largest ridge across the park, running east to west from Dhangarhi to Kalagarh. These ridges are clothed by sal forests and other associates.


Duns

Between the Himalayan and Shiwalik mountain ranges lie elongated valleys called duns. Unlike typical river valleys, duns are formed not due to erosion but have a structural origin. They are covered with boulders and gravel originating from the erosion of the Himalayas and the Shiwalik uplands. One such dun occurs in the northern half of Corbett. This is the Patli Dun and is most visible from Dhikala. Kanda, being higher in the Park, presents a panoramic view of this valley.


Terai-bhabarTypical Shiwalik landscape

The southern boundary of Corbett flanks the ecologically important terai-bhabar region, a strip of land skirting the southern part of the Shiwaliks. It consists of the bhabar region, a narrow belt of sloping land located at the outer margin of Shiwaliks, and the terai swamplands that lie further south of bhabar.

The bhabar tract is porous because it consists mainly of gravel and boulders. It is devoid of streams or springs and water table is quite low. In contrast, the terai is swampy and humid, and contains many springs and slow-flowing streams. Most of the terai once held dense vegetation and was feared for malaria. It has been cleared for agriculture and is one of the most fertile grain production areas of India.

Together, the Terai-bhabar is a distinct ecological region, home to endangered wildlife such as the tiger, rhino, elephant, sloth bear, and vital habitat for for over 500 bird species.

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